Community Medical Centers

The job was intense.  I loved my coworkers.  But I felt something was fraudulent about the certification process where a vendor, Epic, could give themselves a quarter million dollars of their customer’s money just by withholding certification from one person.  Or they could retain the power to control the entire management team using the management team’s desire not to upset Epic and lose the discount.

I passed all my exams and projects with flying colors except one.  And then suddenly I continually handed in exams I felt were perfect or near perfect only to be told they were about 1 question short of the required 85%.  Since I had retaken the exam multiple times and this repetition just about 1 question short of 85% this looked highly suspicious, so rather than having me “pass” or fail and bring suspicion upon Epic and their exam, it seems they tried to cover up the situation by changing the rules mid-way and adding on a five attempt limit.

Winding Down to a Crash

My friends and immediate coworkers, Steve and Mark had passed certification–Steve with a score one point or one question over mine, and Mark with the same score but raised up during a phone call.  Then on Easter morning, Steve passed away and the following month, my mother also passed on.

When I spoke about my concerns regarding Epic’s certification process, I was fired for the first time in my life.  I also learned that it may be common practice for Community Medical Centers to fire people for reporting patient safety issues, fraud, corruption, unethical or dangerous behavior.  Apparently I was neither the first nor the last.  But OSHA does not handle reports of unlawful termination or whistleblower retaliation for non-profits or privately held corporations.  And attorneys in the area do not want to face perhaps the largest consumer of legal services as an adversary.

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