Oracle and Stanford

Shortly before Ingres collapsed, Oracle offered me a position with their Production Unix team, and it seemed like an awesome team to work with.  And it was.  The pay was higher.  The company was more solid.  The database engine was more robust in my opinion, faster performing, more able to withstand abuse such as someone kicking the plug out of the wall.  Replication actually worked.  But I loved my management from the manager immediately over me up to the CEO.  Although the CEO had a reputation for being demanding, I appreciated that greatly.

At Oracle, we could study remotely at Stanford, and I felt it was time for me to gain a good formal education in Computer Science.  I’m glad I did.  Stanford was a tough school.  I was disappointed with their lack of competence and commitment to real integrity in grading and making sure remote students had a playing field equivalent to what on-campus students had.  But the quality of teaching was exceptionally good.

I was eventually asked to help form Oracle’s Enterprise Systems Center later known as the Large Systems Support Center where we performed applied research into performance, scalability, and robustness of exceptionally large database systems.   After some time there, a manager at PeopleSoft started pulling on me to get me to move to PeopleSoft.  My commute would drop from one hour to five minutes, and I would have an opportunity to learn their technology as well.  So, I eventually said yes in spite of loving my job at Oracle.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16